Monday, December 08, 2008

Bon Zai Sachet

Sachets were very popular in traditional Japanese culture, where they served a dual purpose, both practical and esthetic. Traditional garments such as Kimono were not to be washed or laundered or else the beauty of their intricate embroidery and dyes would be compromised. Instead, they were stored in the company of fragrant woods such as cedar or camphor, or dried leaves and spices such as patchouli and cloves, that would impart a pleasing aroma to the clothing and also keep away the month. The art of Japanese incense includes also “incense sachets” - mixtures of ground woods, spices and herbs that promote the good scent of fabrics as well as protect them from the moth.

The first Bon Zai sachet was born especially for my client Yoko, who carries my line in her antique shop in Japan. I was out of the Viola sachets that she ordered, so I made her a Bon Zai sachet instead, which turned out to be a favourite!

Bon Zai sachet is made of several dry botanicals - red sandalwood chips, vetiver rootlets, patchouli leaves and whole rosebuds. These were than infused with cedarwood oil, shiso oil, rose otto, juniper berry and red mandarin to create the full spectrum of Bon Zai’s distinct aroma, adopted for a sachet use.

Besides the pleasing scent of the sachet, it is also a good moth repellent thanks to the patchouli leaves.
Bon Zai sachet in the making - on the scale

Bon Zai sachets are available via and

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