Sunday, April 30, 2006

Pitango


Ripe, originally uploaded by Schröedinger's Cat.

This tiny berry that grows on large bushes, has the shape of little red bell peppers, and a tart flavour with a peculiar aroma that is hard to explain. Like many other tropical fruit, it’s a love it or hate it one. I learned to love it.

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14 Comments:

At May 20, 2006 2:13 AM, Anonymous BOIDE said...

HI AYALA,
I LIVE ISRAEL AND HAVE SOME PITANGO BUSHES,ONLY NOW AFTER 7 YEARS I DEVOVERED THAT WE CAN ESAT IT, I LOVE THE TASTE BUT DONT KNOW HOW TO USE IT OTHER THAN EAT IT LIKE A FRUIT.
PLEASE TELL ME HOW TO GROW IT MORE,
AS THE MINE ARE GROWING BETWEEN OTHER
GATHER PLAN

 
At May 21, 2006 9:34 PM, Blogger Ayala Sender said...

Boide, you are so lucky to have a pitango tree! Where in Israel do you live?
I am not aware of any other use for the fruit. The large seed makes it hard to use it in any other way besides eating the little flesh surrounding the large pit. I vaguely remember someone making a liquer from it - a preparation where the pit won't get in the way... That could be delicious! Perhaps soaking the fruit in some 96% grain alcohol and than adding a sugar syrop. Better go and google some recipes!

 
At April 16, 2009 11:09 AM, Blogger Sarah said...

yes, it's pitango season again, (is there another name for pitango?) it also took a long time for me to get used to it, tastes like a very sweet red pepper to me.

 
At May 20, 2009 1:18 PM, Blogger tc said...

I just enjoyed delicious juicy and highly aromatic red and even one burgundy colored pitango fruit, in Ramat-Gan, Israel.
It is in this case used as a fence hedge. There are still ots of unripened berries hanging.

Interesting that my teeth have just become very sensitive, so there must be a high acidic content which temporarily, I hope, affected the tooth enamel.

I wonder whaat health properties it has.
It tastes as if it might be an astringent and benefit the liver /gall bladder
Possibly enter the HT meridian in Chinese medical terms

I have not verified this (am trying to now, that is how I came across this website, thanks to Prof. Google)

 
At May 20, 2009 2:07 PM, Blogger Ayala Sender said...

tc,
Thank you so much for commenting!
I envy you for eating a pitango, even if it left a sour taste in the mouth... Such an exotic, unusual flavour!
I'm not sure about the health properties or vitamin content of pitango, but I have a feeling it has vitamin C. Yitzhak Ben Uri's vegan-nutritional books may come handy for that - he writes about many unusual fruits. I don't have it handy since I'm traveling in France at the moment. Let me know if you find out anything!

 
At May 22, 2009 4:35 PM, Blogger captbri@hotmail.com said...

I just purchased some Pitango perfume for my wife in Piura, Peru! It smells delicious. The bottle says Natura Ekos Pitanga. Beautiful smell. Brian.

 
At May 30, 2009 9:20 PM, Blogger shalom said...

I have 4 pitango bushes in my garden. Unfortunately 3 will have to go due to house expansion.
I live in central Israel, and am looking for a good home for the bushes.

 
At June 08, 2009 8:31 PM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

Ship bushes to 1910 Biltmore Street NW, Washington DC 20009 and I will pay for shipping (within reason) and give bushes a new home. Thanks.

 
At June 26, 2009 3:06 PM, Blogger Preferred said...

For me, pitango is a beautiful memory from my childhood.
I used to eat pitango when walking to school.
That was in Kfar Vitkin Israel in the 60s-70s.

3 years ago, while on vacation walking down the street in Miami, I spotted the fruit growing on a hedge. We ate quite a few and saved the seeds.

Back home in LA, we planted the seeds and 3 nice size bushes grew.
No fruit so far...
I hope I don't have to wait another 4 years for the bushes to give fruit....

 
At August 15, 2009 7:05 AM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

I love the fruit and planted some pips about 3 years ago and now have moved to an apt with a balcony facing West with strong afternoon sun. My pitango is in a pot now but doesn't look good. Any suggestions out there - I live in Central Israel.
Julie

 
At May 11, 2010 5:26 AM, Blogger Liliana said...

A friend told me she uses pitango seeds she keeps in the freezer to thicken and shorten cooking time for jams. Tried it but was not overly impressed.
Anyone else heard of such a use? Proportions? Crack the seeds or use them closed?

 
At May 11, 2010 8:05 AM, Blogger Ayala Sender said...

Preferred -
I have family in Kfar Vitkin, what a cool place!
Hope your bushes bear fruit soon :-)

Julie,
I'm sorry I don't have any tips. I would ask a local nursery about that, they should know what to do. It might be too much sun?

Liliana,
If the seeds have pectin, than this would help with jams. That's why you make citrus jams with the seeds and remove them later. Same for apple, quince and pear cores - it's the seeds that have most of the pectin and help "set" the jam. If pitango seeds are like that as well, you won't need to crash them. just cook them whole and remove them. But a bit of lemon juice or seeds of the above will be easier to find and guaranteed to be effective!

 
At August 21, 2012 8:19 AM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

Irene
I am growing pitango seeds. Will I get some fruit one day??????????

 
At November 04, 2013 10:45 AM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

This is a brazilian fruit named Pitanga. The name comes from tupi (native indians in Brazil) and means intense red. Its delicious and in Brazil is used for ice creams, juices and even cosmetics. Of course you can eat it straight from the tree.

 

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